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post" senior, senior correspondent karen de young for a conversation on u.s.-pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we are so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize if you guess who are here with us tonight. undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, judith mchale. [applause] principle deputy assistant secretary for economic energy and business affairs, deborah mccarthy. [applause] members of our corporate advisory council and of course our many ambassadors and diplomatic colleagues who work very closely throughout the years on our embassy events. our next one is going to be in july at the embassy exam the end it will be on african women leaders promoting investment, trade and peace. we are hoping that many of you will be able to join us for this very special event. and now it gives me great plea
pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
africa. that pakistan has always been his focus, and there's a reason it's the most dangerous place on earth. it's the fifth largest nuclear power. up to 100 nuclear weapons. it's estimated they have more terrorist groups for square-mile and in a place you can find in that region. as we might suspect from the fact that bin laden had the planes fly for years, their security service, the isi has close ties to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a numbe
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
claims under investigation now that pakistan spent millions here in america to influence u.s. policy. and the fbi is claiming pakistan's spy agency was secretly funneling money to this man, an american running a nonprofit group based in the washington d.c. that investigation heating up. >>> slumping home sales hit a seven-month low indicating continued weakness in the housing market in this country. how is the soft demand affecting the overall economy? america's asking. send us your questions for today's town hall usa. [ male announcer ] this is coach parker... whose non-stop day starts with back pain... and a choice. take advil no and maybe up to four in a day. or choose aleve and two pills for a day free of pain. way to go, coach. ♪ jenna: welcome back, everybody. we have this fox news alert. we've been telling you about this proposal, this long-term debt reduction proposal by the gang of sick, a bipartisan group of senators that have developed this plan. there they are on the screen. the question is, what happens next? what are they going to do to make this an actual reality? it
the truth is that al-qaida's hierarchy in afghanistan and pakistan that he's referring to has been severely weakened. we've seen several al-qaida leaders killed over the past ewu months and years. to say al-qaida's hierarchy has been weakened and could possibly be defeated is true. but al-qaida has shifted to yemen, to somalia and also the al-qaida movement. it's become such a global galvanizing movement, brian. you have self-starters here in america, in england who are acting on their own with no direct link to al-qaida so you can defeat al-qaida, yes, but the movement that al-qaida has sparked, the ideology is the real problem here and brian, real quick, this administration when they talk about the war on terror, the war against radical islam, they have tunnel vision! al-qaida is only one element of a much broader enemy, iran, hezbollah and the muslim brotherhood which this administration wants to reach out to. >> which is a little crazy. tell us about this bomb throw, we'll talk about this a little bit later as well. tell about the next move is sewing these explosive devices into people'
is happening with pakistan. there are questions about whether or not pakistan is really our friend or our foe. the second thing about foreign policy experience, you do not have to have had extensive foreign policy experience to know how to listen to the experts. president obama just announced his withdrawal plan from afghanistan. he didn't listen to general petraeus. he didn't listen to admiral mullen. they have again on record as saying it was more aggressive than they thought. common sense says, you don't reduce your force by a third and announce it to your enemy in order to fulfill some political promise. what kind of foreign experience do you need to listen to your experts in order to be able to make the right decision? >> sean: you came under fire early in the campaign. i never saw you mad before. you got sick and tired of answering the question about muslims in your administration. >> yes. >> sean: a reporter asked you again and you off on him a little. tell us your real position and what happened? >> throughout my business career i've always hired the best people, irrespective of race,
signal nato weakness, implications in places like syria and egypt and have implications like pakistan, as well. a lot rides on this more than just getting rid of khadafy, who yet again in past days has called for a return to terrorism something he used before and is threatening again. one more reason to get rid of him. >> gregg: last question -- there is a new study by the eisenhower research project and it concluded that u.s. involvement in afghanistan, pakistan and iraq has cost up to 4 trillion dollars over the past decade. your reaction to that? >> i think that study is badly flawed for a number of reasons. it's counting costs we would have incurred anyway for the existence of the military. it does focus on the potential explosion of medical costs. that is something i think even defenders of the defense department have said for some time that is an area of cost cutting we ought to be looking at. badly flawed but there are points worth taking into account going forward. >> gregg: unless anyone thinks we forgets, more than 6,000 american lives in various wars over the past decade, h
or the hindus in pakistan, religious minorities have for centuries lived and worshiped alongside their muslim countrymen and women. unfortunately instability in the middle east has had a disproportionately negative impact on religious minorities, the most striking example of this has been in iraq where more than half of the iraqi christian population has been forced to flee the country since the invasion of iraq in 2003. those who have stayed have been specifically targeted in gruesome and random acts of violence, such as murder, rape and abduction. this includes religious and community leaders like archbishop rahall who has been kidnapped and murdered. religious minorities who have suffered attacks in their places of worship such as the october, 2010, massacre at our lady of salvation church in baghdad in which 58 worshipers were killed by militants and extremists. while the end of the mubarak regime in ejiment has brought about the promise for a -- in ejiment has brought about the promise for -- in egypt has brought about promise for religious reform, coptic christians have lived peacefully
to go to for jihadists and afghanistan, iran, excuse me, afghanistan, iraq, pakistan or yemen but as many as two dozen muslim americans and al-shabaab with many cases trained by al qaeda leaders remain unaccounted for. the committee has found that all chabad related federal prosecutions for funding, recruiting and attempting to join al-shabaab are the largest number and most significant upward trend in the terror cases filed for the justice department over the past two years. least 38 cases have been unsealed since 2009. minnesota, ohio, california, new jersey, new york, illinois, alabama, virginia and texas three al-shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques and disalle communities like minneapolis and san diego. according to the justice department. this month and also of recruiter pleaded guilty to a recording a large group of muslims from minneapolis at mosques and without any known protest moscow's leaders. a top also leader in somalia supervised this recruiting. one minnesota recruited was a suicide bomber whose 2008 attack on northern somalia send shock waves of alarm
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)